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Climate injustice for sale in Northeast’s carbon trade

CvC’s Dan Fischer writes in Climate Connections:

Climate injustice for sale in Northeast’s carbon trade

By Dan Fischer, 5 November 2013, Special to Climate Connections

smoke-stack-pollution

With establishment environmentalists’ support, the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic states wish to update and expand the region’s electricity sector cap-and-trade program known as the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative or RGGI. At quarterly auctions, RGGI sells permits for pollution to electricity companies, banks and other bidders, before letting these parties trade with each other on a pollution market. An update currently being implemented to RGGI’s Model Rule[1] would lower the number of pollution rights sold at these auctions, theoretically reducing the region’s pollution over time. A number of factors, however, make RGGI unlikely to fairly or effectively reduce emissions.RGGI’s update could bring to the region new pollution hotspots in poor and minority communities, increased use of carbon offsets, and a greater reliance on dirty, greenhouse gas-emitting energy sources like biomass and natural gas.

Read more: http://climate-connections.org/2013/11/05/climate-injustice-for-sale-in-northeasts-carbon-trade/

Here are the footnotes that got cut off:

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San Onofre Nuke Plant is Dead!

English: Anti nuclear power movement's Smiling...

English: Anti nuclear power movement’s Smiling Sun logo “Nuclear Power? No Thanks” Deutsch: Die Lachende Sonne der Anti-Atomkraftbewegung (“Atomkraft? Nein Danke!”) mit englischem Text Dansk: Solmærket (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

by HARVEY WASSERMAN

From his California beach house at San Clemente, Richard Nixon once watched three reactors rise at nearby San Onofre. As of June 7, 2013, all three are permanently shut.

It’s a monumental victory for grassroots activism. it marks an epic transition in how we get our energy.
In the thick of the 1970s Arab oil embargo, Nixon said there’d be 1000 such reactors in the US by the year 2000.
As of today, there are 100.

Four have shut here this year. Citizen activism has put the “nuclear renaissance” into full retreat.

Just two of 54 reactors now operate in Japan, where Fukushima has joined Chernobyl and Three Mile Island in permanently scarring us all.

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